La Fille Mal Gardee in comparison and contrast to Romeo and Juliet

After watching a portion of La Fille Mal Gardee, I noticed that this ballet was a similar love story to that of Romeo & Juliet. In comparison, both ballets portray two teenagers who are in love with one another—which their parents don’t approve of. However, they go against their parent’s disapproval and decide to continue seeing one another. In contrast, while Lise and Colas was given their parents approval to be together at the end of the play, Romeo and Juliet‘s parents did not allow them to be together, causing them to take matters into their own hands and commit suicide.
This video excerpt from La Fille Mal Gardee reminded me of the balcony scene included in the Romeo & Juliet ballet. In both ballets, the dancers express their love with their facial expressions and swift movements. It’s also inclusive of music that expresses the happiness that they get from being with one another. However, like the play in general, this scene from La Fille Mal Gardee had a more blissful ending as the two dancers had to part ways, whereas Romeo and Juliet had a sense of gloom and uneasiness as they departed.

Dia Clark

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3 thoughts on “La Fille Mal Gardee in comparison and contrast to Romeo and Juliet

  1. I agree with Dia in that this scene and the balcony scene are comparable- both scenes express the beginning of the couple’s relationships with one another. In La Fille Mal Gardee- this scene portrays the young couple falling for eachother in a blissful state. They are surrounded by friends and perhaps family who are dancing with them. This shows that although the village may not approve of their relationship right off the bat, they eventually support this young love. The couple in La Fille Mal Gardee also reflect the more innocent and playful love in the world- one that is not necessarily concerned with serious events,but more with understanding eachother and loving one another almost as children, blind to the world around them. Compared to Romeo and Juliet, where the young lovers are distraught over their feelings for eachother, La Fille Mal Gardee reflects the happier sentiments of love.

    Mariah Bartelmez

  2. As Dia said, you can definitely see the similarities between the love stories with the exception of the fact that La Fille Mal Gardee has a happy ending in contrast to the tragic ending of Romeo and Juliet. In La Fille Mal Gardee everything from the music to the choreography gives the love story a light, hopeful feeling, foreshadowing the happy ending. The same elements were used in Romeo and Juliet to give the exact opposite feeling which foreshadowed the lovers’ impending doom. Basically, the expression on the dancers faces, how their movements flowed, the energy of the music, and the stage set hint to the ending of the ballet. In Romeo and Juliet the dancers appeared very distraught over their feelings for one another, the music was often depressing, and the stage set was dark and gloomy. However, in La Fille Mal Gardee the two lovers were excited and hopeful about their love, the music was light and energetic, and the set was complete with flowers and bright colors.

    Amanda Ziegler

  3. I’m really glad Dia posted this clip because I really love the ribbon dance in the beginning. That was definitely something different from Romeo and Juliet. But I do agree that the love story behind the dance is very profound as it is in Romeo and Juliet. I see the passion in the dance especially when Colas lifts Lise. The lifts were very beautiful and had really clean lines, like the lifts in Romeo and Juliet. I love how the youth of the characters shines through in their dancing. You can really see that Colas and Lise are two teenagers in love- desperately seeking the approval of their parents. Unlike Romeo and Juliet, the families are less determined to keep their children apart and the story has a happy ending which I really enjoyed.

    Natalie D’Addieco

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